Here’s What’s New on Our YouTube Channel!

Happy September, everybody! Last month, we uploaded a bunch of new videos to help you with your job search. Let’s see what they were.

Seminars

Remote Job Interviews

In these unprecedented times, more companies are opting for job interviews over the phone or by video conference. In this video, Career Coach Anne Nowak talks about best practices and things to avoid when interviewing remotely.

Intro to Cover Letters

Sure, you’ve got a killer resume – but a cover letter is what brings your job application over the edge. There’s just one problem: you don’t know where to start! Resume Coach Lynnette Lee is here to help with this recorded seminar.

Job Search Basics

We started a new playlist that will help you with the very basics of searching for work in 2020, including tutorials on using a computer and the Internet.

Creating an email address

Career Specialist Case Duckworth walks you through creating a new email address at the ever-popular Gmail.

Creating good passwords

Passwords are like keys … well, sort of. Career Specialist Richard Wright shows you the dos and don’ts of good password creation in this video.

Job Application Walk-throughs

Dollar Tree

Lynnette Lee walks you through an application at the popular convenience store.

Lowe’s

If you’re interested in a career in retail or home improvement, Career Specialist Cynthia Payton will walk you through an application at the big-box store Lowe’s.

Job Search Resources

The Career Center’s website has a ton of job search resources, which Resume Coach Lynnette Lee walks you through in this video.

Job Interview Scenarios

Tell me about your computer skills

Anne Nowak and Lynnette Lee discuss good – and bad! – answers to this interview question, which is only getting commoner.

Website Reviews

Power to Fly

Power to Fly is a woman-led company that specializes in helping women land technical roles, with events, career coaching, and job boards. Anne Nowak reviews the site’s pluses and minuses in this video.

Conclusion

That’s all the videos we posted in August. If you have an idea for a video, or would like to request one, drop us a line, give us a call, or come in and see us!

Written by Case Duckworth

Career Focus: Veterinary Technology

Veterinary technology is a growing field that’s a good fit for people looking to work with animals or in a medical setting. The profession dates back to the 1940s, and today the field boasts a national organization (NAVTA), a robust accreditation process, and careers in specialties ranging from dental to emergency, internal medicine, and anesthesia. If you love animals and want to provide them with medical attention, a career as a vet tech might be for you.

The good parts of a vet tech JOB

  • If you work in a veterinary office (as over 90% of vet techs do), you’ll see your animal patients over the course of their lives, and you’ll get to help their owners be the best pet parents they can be. You’ll provide advice on nutrition, grooming, medication, behavior, and disease prevention.
  • If, instead, you work for a zoo or as a farm tech, you’ll work with larger animals (some of them exotic), many times out-of-doors, and your patients’ owners will have different priorities for the health and safety of their animals. You’ll provide many of the same services to your patients, though, including recording medical histories, monitor behavior, administer medications, and treat animals that are sick.
  • If you’d prefer a more clinical setting, a career in animal research or surgery might be a better fit. Even veterinary office techs assist the attending veterinarian in surgeries at the practice, but you can also be certified as an Emergency or Critical Care Technician to help animals suffering from severe trauma. You can also work in a research lab, developing new medications, testing the safety of pet food, or figuring out best practices for disaster preparedness.
  • No matter which specialty you choose, you’ll have the joy of working with animals every day. You will also enjoy the perks of being in a field with a high demand for certified professionals, including multiple job opportunities, rare lay-offs, and a fairly recession-proof career. Most candidates are considered qualified for an entry-level vet tech position after a two-year associate degree, and with the multiple certifications available, career (and pay) advancements are relatively easy to find.

The not-so-good parts of a vet tech job

  • Your earnings may vary widely.  The median salary is around $35,000, but there’s a wide range, dependent on how big the practice is, how rural your area is, and what kind of vet tech you are. If you’re working for a small practice, you’ll be making less than if you work in research, but you’ll need less education to begin working. Zoos and aquariums pay much less to start, since the entry-level positions are internships. However, the median pay for vet techs has been trending upward, and it’s expected to continue.
  • The job can be physically  demanding. Vet techs can work up to 12-hour shifts, and on weekends and evenings, too. Over the long workdays, techs can be expected to lift and wrangle pets weighing up to 100 pounds. Many animals are scared or hurting when they come to the vet, so they can be guarded or even aggressive. You will have to deal with all sorts of bodily fluids, some of which can make you sick.
  • There can be a heavy mental toll: Since most vet techs get into the field through a deep love of animals, seeing those animals hurt, struggle, and sometimes die can be very difficult. Some techs experience what’s called “compassion fatigue,” where caring about their patients wears them out.

All that being said, many veterinary technicians derive a deep satisfaction and sense of worth from their careers. Even though the work can be hard, it can be equally rewarding.

Becoming a veterinary technician

Generally, before getting a job as a vet tech you’ll need to have a degree from an accredited veterinary technology program, then become certified through a state board. In Louisiana, that board is the Louisiana Board of Veterinary Medicine (LSBVM). There are currently four accredited schools in Louisiana that offer veterinary technology degrees:

There are also accredited online programs. You can find more information at the following websites, and around the web:

After you get your degree, you’ll need to be accredited. For information on accreditation, as well as continuing education and certification, visit the LSBVM’s website.

Further reading

Most of the information in this blog post has been taken from Careers in Veterinary Technology: Vet Tech, a publication by the Careers Internet Database. You can find more information about veterinary technology and other careers by visiting their website.

If a career with animals sounds like something you’d like to look further into, see our Cool Careers blog post about different options.

You can also check out the following links, provided by the Careers Internet Database:

Written by Case Duckworth

New Career Center Books

The Career Center has just received a set of books from the Masters at Work series by Simon and Schuster Publishing. This series of career exploration guides aims to help job-seekers understand their career options.

Synopsis: Each book in this series contains in-depth interviews with  experts in the field, including discussion of how the person achieved success, what the job is like on a daily basis, and pros and cons of working in that field. Described by the publishers as “the best virtual internship you’ll ever have,” these books hope to provide job-seekers with insight into whether the chosen field would be a good career fit for them.

Titles in this series include:

Becoming an Architect by Janelle Zara

Becoming a Baker by Glynnis MacNicol

Becoming an Ethical Hacker by Gary Mivlin

Becoming a Hairstylist by Kate Bolick

Becoming a Life Coach by Tom Chiarella

Becoming a Marine Biologist by Virginia Morell

Becoming a Neurosurgeon by John Colapinto

Becoming a Private Investigator by Howie Kahn

Becoming a Sommelier by Rosie Schaap 

Becoming a Venture Capitalist by Gary Mivlin

Becoming a Yoga Instructor 

You can place a hold on any of these books through the East Baton Rouge Parish Library’s online catalog. And for additional career path advice, please feel free to call the Career Center at 225-231-3733 to make an appointment for career coaching.

Written by Lynnette Lee

Cool Careers: Video Production and Radio Broadcasting

This past summer, the Career Center hosted a seminar on careers in radio broadcasting and video production. Our guest speakers were Stuart Poulton of Stuart Poulton Productions and Latangela Sherman of Cumulus Media Radio. For those who missed it, here are the main takeaways:

Video Production

Video production is the process of producing video content. It is the equivalent of filmmaking, but with images recorded digitally instead of on film stock. There are three stages of video production: pre-production, production, and post-production. Pre-production is the process in which things are set up in preparation for filming – the location, timing, script, etc..  The initial production phase is where the filming takes place. Lastly, post-production is where the editing of a video takes place. This could include changes to color, editing of scenes, voice overs and graphics.

How do I Get Started in this field?

No formal training is needed, but you will need to learn the necessary skills through hands-on experience. Get practice by creating your own videos. Most smartphones have video capabilities. Look for video editing apps that will help you polish your product. You can also upload your videos to Youtube to be seen by the world.

If you truly have a passion to get into this profession, seek out internships to help you gain critical experience, knowledge, and skills. There are also video production classes at community colleges and universities.

What equipment do I need?

The equipment needed is anything that can capture video and sound. To do more advanced things, you would need the proper software and equipment for editing. The cost can be anywhere from a few hundred to many thousands of dollars. More important than equipment is a portfolio of your work. You will need to prove that you have experience and a passion for video production. This will also show off your many talents and expertise.

How much will I Make?

As of Jul 25, 2019, the average annual pay for a Video Producer in the United States is around $55,855 a year. In major studios or production companies, you may earn up to $87,500 and as low as $21,500.

Radio Broadcasting

Do people still listen to the local radio in a world where we now have satellite radio and the internet? The answer is yes! Do people only listen to the radio for music? That is a definite no. The local radio is needed not for just entertainment, but for information and local events that only pertain to the area you live in. The radio is crucial as a free resource which is easy for everyone to access.

Jobs in Radio Broadcasting

There are a number of positions both on the air and in the background, including:

  • Sports Broadcaster/Announcer Radio Show Host
  • Disc Jockey
  • Radio News Reporter
  • TV News Reporter
  • TV News Anchor Person
  • Script Writer
  • Airtime Sales
  • Sound and Audio Technician
  • Lawyer (for legal and copyright issues)

Education

A degree in broadcasting, combined with hands-on experience working in radio, will make you an attractive candidate in this field. Local universities and various community colleges offer a degree in Mass Communication with concentrations in Radio Broadcasting, including LSU, Southern, and BRCC. There are also many internships offered locally with Cumulus Media.

Pay

The salary range for broadcasting careers vary greatly. Those working in a small town for radio station can be as little as $15000-$25,000 per year. Those in bigger markets can make from $45,000 to $90,000 per year. This is why it is important to have a versatile background covering all aspects in the field. If you have this experience, then there is more potential for growth.

Written by Alvin Coleman

Cool Careers: Videogame Design

This past summer, the Career Center hosted a seminar about careers in the video game industry, featuring guest speakers from the gaming company Electronic Arts (EA). Here are the main takeaways from that seminar:

Jobs in the Industry

  • Game Designers: come up with the concepts that eventually become video game productions. Collaborate with other members of the development team including artists, programmers, and audio engineers. A computer science background is required for this position.
  • Programmers: create the code that converts game designs into instructions video game systems can read to make everything function. A computer science background is required for this position.
  • Animators:  make the graphics come to life in a video game.
  • Artists: draw characters, scenery, and box art.
  • Audio Engineers: create/engineer sounds which add depth to the gameplay and atmosphere.
  • Voice actors: make a game come to life by voicing characters and narration, adding dramatic value to help in storytelling. Typically a background in voice-over work or acting is required.
  • Writers and editors: create the story of a game, and proofread all grammatical errors. A degree in English is usually required.
  • Lawyers: deal with copyright, censorship, and distribution rights to make sure everything with the release of a game is legally compliant. Requires a law degree.
  • Video Game Testers: test video games to detect bugs and errors in different levels of the game. Work alongside game designers and programmers to ensure that a game works flawlessly before it is released. Education needed for this is a high school diploma with a keen eye for spotting errors and following directions.

Local Job Opportunities

The easiest way to enter into the industry through EA would be the role of a video game tester. Electronic Arts has a testing center in Baton Rouge on LSU’s campus. They have opportunities for both part-time and full-time positions. You must be 17 years of age with a high school diploma, or equivalent. The presenters of the seminar actually started off as videogame testers and have moved up to receivers and EA brand ambassadors.

Pay

The video game industry has a wide range of salaries. Programmers make between $44,000 to $80,000 a year. Other non-technical jobs, such as customer service representatives, could make up to $35,000 a year.  Videogame testers can expect to start out at $11.00 an hour.

Final Thought

The video game industry is an exciting field that is constantly growing. If you are a person who loves videogames, and would like to work on doing something that you love, then this would be an excellent field to look into. EA has plenty of information listed on their website.

Written by Alvin Coleman

Cool Careers: Criminal Justice and Private Investigations

This past summer, the Career Center hosted a seminar on Careers in Criminal Justice and Private Investigations, featuring two guest speakers. The first speaker was Professor Dan Cain of the Criminal Justice Department of Bossier Parish Community College. The second presenter was Chris McCullough, a Special Investigator for the FBI.

Why Choose Criminal Justice?

Many people enter into a Criminal Justice Career to help others. You can use your skills to aid victims of crime, perform counter-terrorism and surveillance, counsel and rehabilitate criminals, or oversee the progress of a parolee. It’s worth noting that, although most people equate “criminal justice” with “police officer,” there are many more options in this field.

What Careers are there in Criminal Justice?

  • National Security Agency Police Officer:  keep NSA facilities safe and secure. Requires at minimum an associate’s degree; however, pay may be more with a bachelor’s in criminal justice. The average salary for this career is $50,283.
  • Fraud Analyst: follow a trail of clues back to the individuals who steal money or identities from banking customers. Typically requires a bachelor degrees in computer science, finance, banking or a related field. Expect to make an average salary of $46,344.
  • Ranger: Do you love the great outdoors? Do you love National Parks or Wild Life Preserves? Then you can make a career enforcing the law in these places as a ranger. Rangers are the first responders to natural or manmade threats to forest areas and rangelands. They help combat forest fires, respond to criminal activities, and perform search and rescue missions. To become a forest ranger, you must be able to possess a bachelor’s degree or higher in environmental or life sciences. You can expect to earn an average of $57,000.
  • Federal Air Marshal: in a post-9/11 world this career has become much more important to providing the safety of air travel. A federal air marshal is the first line of defense in a threat in the sky. A Marshal must be armed at all times and will be able to recognize suspicious behavior while at the same time blending in with other passengers. A master’s degree in criminal justice, police science, aviation management, or similar specialties may improve their chances of obtaining a job as a federal air marshal. Expect to earn an average of $47,000.
  • Private Investigator: get information for individuals, law offices, and corporations. Private investigators often have histories of police service and are required to have licenses to function legally. A private investigator creates a business and keeps track of expenses as well as organizes information gathered for clients. To become a private investigator, there is no formal education process, but there are some agencies that require a Certificate in the field. It wouldn’t hurt to have a degree in criminal justice. Expect to make $45,000 in this field.
  • Transit Office: make sure subways, busses, and public trains are safe. Transit and railroad police may receive training in emergency preparedness. These individuals must be comfortable working in large groups where accidents and disasters are ever present. The minimal level of education often accepted by most police departments is a high school diploma or a G.E.D certification. However, many departments around the country require at least a couple of years of college coursework, such as an associate’s degree in criminal justice. Expect to earn around $52,000.

Final Thought

Criminal Justice can be a lucrative and rewarding field. One must remember that you don’t have to be a police officer to serve the public. Every career in the criminal justice field is essential. You can find more information on Criminal Justice education programs in Baton Rouge at the BRCC Criminal Justice website.

Written by Alvin Coleman

Cool Careers: Working with Animals

This past summer, the Career Center hosted a seminar on careers in animal science. The presenter of this seminar was Jennifer Godfrey from the LSU School of Veterinary Science. In case you missed it, here are some of the main takeaways:

What Type of Jobs are there?

Veterinarian: provide medical treatment to animals as large as an elephant or as small as a snake. Requires a four-year veterinary medical degree in addition to a bachelor’s degree. Getting into veterinary school is fiercely competitive – LSU’s Vet school is one of only 30 schools in the United States with this program. One must have a very strong math and science background and strive for the highest grades possible to be considered for admission. It is best to have at least have a 3.5 GPA.  Once you finish vet school, you can expect to earn starting off at $80,000 a year. You can find out more information at the LSU vet school website.

Veterinarian Tech/ Assistant:  help veterinarians provide medical and health care for animals. This is a great alternative for people who want to work in this field without dealing with the cost and amount of education that a Veterinarian would require. You would need to pass the Veterinary Technician National Exam to become licensed as a vet tech.  Although technically only a high school education is required, most vet techs go through  certificate or associate degree programs that prepare them for the licensing exam. BRCC offers an Associate of Applied Science in Veterinary Technology, based on the requirements of the American Veterinary Medical Association. You can find out more information here at the BRCC vet tech website.

Animal Groomer: help pets look their best by cleaning them and trimming fur. You must have at least a high school diploma. Most training takes place on the job, but some choose to study at a grooming school. The median salary is around $21,260 annually, while those who make the highest salary earn more than $34,000 a year.

Kennel Attendant, Pet Sitter, and Dog Walkers: care for pets in the absent of their owners. Usually requires a minimum of a high school diploma. You can learn additional skills while on the job. Those who work in kennels or shelters can learn more about the job by taking classes through the Humane Society of the United States and the American Humane Association. Pet sitters can obtain additional education through the National Association of Professional Pet Sitters.

Final Thought

If you are a person who loves animals and providing them care, there are many opportunities to make a living from it. Being a veterinarian isn’t the only way to work with animals. You should always research and see what you feel what would be best for you. As a start, it would be an excellent idea to volunteer at a shelter or even work at a pet store like Petsmart or Petco. The opportunities are out there waiting to be discovered and experienced.

Written by Alvin Coleman

Cool Careers: Forensic Science and Crime Scene Investigation

This past summer, the Career Center hosted a seminar on Careers in Forensic Science and Crime Scene Investigation. There were two guest speakers. The first representative was Claire Shepard with LA Delta Community College, and the second was Zachary Shawn with the Louisiana State police. For those who missed it, here are the main takeaways:

what is it really like?

Most people think of the TV show “CSI” when they think of the field of forensics – but the show is not entirely realistic. In the real world, it may take months if not years to solve a case. Nevertheless, it is still an interesting field for anyone who is interested in taking a more scientific approach to Criminal Justice. There are a plethora of jobs in this field, both in the lab and out in the field. The pay in most of these careers usually range from $39,000 to around $60,000. The more advanced fields that require a doctorate degree can pay much more.

Laboratory careers

  • DNA forensic analyst: compare DNA samples taken from suspects and victims to determine whether someone was at a crime scene. Requires a degree in chemistry or biology.
  • Toxicologist: help investigators identify the causes of death that include poisons or chemicals. Also assist in the prosecution of DUI and DWI arrests and can detect the presence of drugs or alcohol in a suspect or victim’s blood. Requires a degree in chemistry, biology, or both.
  • Forensic pathologist: Also known as a medical examiner. Conduct autopsies to determine whether a case was homicide, learn the type of weapons used, and approximate a time of death. This is a position for licensed doctors and thus requires an MD.

Field Careers:

  • Bloodstain Pattern Analyst: analyze patterns of blood at the scene of a crime. This can help determine the type of weapon used, whether a struggle occurred, the direction of travel of a victim or suspect, etc.. Requires a bachelor’s degree in natural science or biology.
  • Forensic Ballistics Expert: analyze firearm patterns and residue at a crime scene. This can help with tracing a bullet back to a gun, identifying the type of firearm used, etc..
  • Arson Investigators: Use residue, ash, and other substances left after a fire to discover if a fire was intentional arson or the result of an accident. The education required for a career as an arson investigator is on par with that of police officers. While a bachelor’s degree is not required, a degree in a forensic-science-related field would increase your chances.

Final thought

If you’d enjoy using your analytical and problem-solving skills to provide justice, then this is the field for you. You just have to be sure that you are not too sensitive to violent scenes or dealing with bodily fluids. More information can be found on the Delta Community College website.

Written by Alvin Coleman

Cool Careers in Film, Entertainment, and Digital Media

The Career Center recently hosted a seminar on careers in the Louisiana Film, Entertainment, and Digital Media Industries. The presenting guest was Chris Stelly, Executive Group Director, Entertainment & Digital Media for Louisiana. Here are some of the main takeaways, in case you missed it:

Film

Most people think that “film career” is synonymous with “acting career”. However, there are a wide variety of film careers besides acting, including:

  • Photography: encompasses everything from the actual filming of a production to taking stills for promotion.
  • Digital design: working with computers to change what we see on the screen. A good example of this is in the Louisiana-filmed movie “Ray” starring Jamie Foxx, in which the ground was digitally changed to another color to reflect the look of that area.
  • Sound mixing: technicians can make a movie far more exciting or dramatic by use of sounds ranging from a simple pin drop to a loud explosion.
  • Costume/production design: an excellent choice for people who are artistic and creative and contribute to everything from furniture to costumes.
  • Hair and Make-up:  a hair and make-up artist can provide a look or style, but could also provide a special effect such as an alien, or make actors look period-appropriate for films set in other centuries.
  • Location scouting: many “scouters” go out in search of landscapes and locations to mimic other ones in order to bring a realistic experience on film. One example given was that a movie was filmed in Hammond, LA yet it was made to look as if you were in the Bronx, NY.

How to break into the industry: To get into this industry it would be a great idea to start off with small and local productions. The more experience you get, the more credible you are. For the technical side of the industry, there are many courses at local Universities and Community Colleges which you could take to improve upon and further advance in your field.

Entertainment and Music:

Louisiana has a rich and unique musical history. There are many ways a person can be involved in this industry. A few examples are:

  • Producing music for artists
  • Recording, editing, and/or mixing music
  • Performing music as a vocalist or instrumentalist
  • Promoting artists

How to break into the industry: There is no set course for breaking into the music industry – for the most part, it’s not about which classes you take in school. Instead, focus on finding and creating opportunities for yourself. Learn by doing – volunteer your time and skills for local projects. Search for internships in your field. Networking will be a huge part of your strategy – reaching out and forming connections and relationships with people in the industry.

Digital Media/Videogames:

Digital media is a rapidly growing field in Louisiana. The main field that was mentioned during this seminar was the videogame industry – everything from mobile games to console games. A video game production can be just as large as a movie. There are many different positions which are all essential to videogame production. A few examples are:

  • Art design for the general art and look of a game.
  • Sound design for effects.
  • Computer programming for the operation of the game.
  • Voice acting
  • Writing for the story and tone of the game
  • Game testing for errors or bugs
  • Legal and licensing division to ensure that everything in a game is in copyrighted and licensing standards

How to break into the industry: You must have the technology skills to get into this field. Many of the skills can be learned at two-year colleges. For the other aspects such as the legal division, you would need a legal background and education. Video game testing in this field usually requires a high school education and a keen eye to spotting errors and following instructions. In fact, Baton Rouge has a video game testing center for Electronic Arts (EA) on LSU’s campus.

Final Thought

Since the creation of the pioneering motion picture incentive program in 2002, Louisiana has created many opportunities. More information can be found on the Louisiana Economic Development website and the Film Baton Rouge website.

Written by Alvin Coleman

Cool Careers: Industrial Trades and Aviation Technology

The Career Center recently hosted a seminar on Careers in Aviation Technology and Industrial Trades. There were two guest speakers. The first representative was Brian Capone with the BRCC Aviation program. The second presenter was Connie Fabre with the Greater Baton Rouge Industry alliance. If you missed this seminar, here are some key points:

Aviation Careers

Aviation isn’t just working with airplanes. There are many branches to the tree of aviation. Here are some examples:

Pilot:  If you enjoy technology, travel, and a general interest in aviation, then a pilot would be a great career choice. To be a pilot you must attend flight school and additional safety training. You can also get additional certifications to increase your income. There are so many directions this career field can take you, the sky is literally the limit. Here are a few examples:

  • Private Pilot or VFR Pilot: an entry-level pilot position. You operate under Visual Flight Rules (VFR), meaning you can fly small aircraft while the horizon is visible. This requires a minimum of 10 hours of flight experience.
  • Military Pilot: much of the training is the same as a regular pilot, but you’d be working directly for a branch of the US military.
  • Fire, Police, and Medical Pilot: In today’s world there can be many unpredictable circumstances in which a pilot is needed. This can range from a forest fire in California, to a high speed chase, to even a rescue mission from an oil rig in the Gulf of Mexico.
  • Commercial Pilot: must have an airline transport pilot certification, at least 1500 hours of flight experience, and a bachelor’s degree in aircraft operations, aviation, aeronautical engineering, or a related field. It take around three years to reach this level as a pilot.
  • Flight Instructor: must have a commercial pilot’s license, a valid third class FAA medical certificate, and a passing score on the FAA knowledge test.

Non-Pilot Aviation Careers: There are many other fields in aviation besides piloting. A few examples are:

  • Air Marshal: law enforcement officers who ride on airplanes who are trained to immediately take out a threat or conflict in order to maintain safety to all persons onboard.
  • Air Traffic Controller: make the decisions as to which planes can take off and land. Controllers seek to avoid crashes and other incidents involving aircraft by communicating directly with pilots and directing their actions.  They have an enormous amount of responsibility and must be good at problem solving. This is a very rewarding career which starts at around $40k, and many well-seasoned controllers make close to $100k.
  • Aviation Mechanic: If something breaks, it must be fixed. There is a growing need for aircraft mechanics today. This field pays very well also – expect to make an average starting salary of $50,000 per year or around $26 per hour. BRCC offers training for this profession. An alternative is to get training from the military.

INDUSTRIAL TRADES

There are many high-paying industrial careers in Louisiana. Oil, natural gas, and chemical plants are a vital part of the state’s economy. A few examples of these jobs are:

  • Plant Operator: supervises the operation of an industrial plant. Operators are needed in utilities, power plants, or chemical plants such as gas extraction facilities, petrochemical or oil refineries. Education for this career can be obtained through a two-year degree from a community college. Average pay for this career can start at $21.00 an hour, and salary will rise quickly. The average chemical plant operator in Louisiana earns $67,000 per year.
  • Welder: fabrication and assembly of metal structures and equipment through the use of welders, cutters, shapers and measuring tools. Welders are needed not only in chemical plants, but general construction of buildings to ship yards. Education for this career can be obtained by apprenticeships which range from 6,000 to 8,000 hours in length, or three to four years at 2,000 hours per year. Much of the training for this career path can be completed at a community college or vo-tech school. Welding jobs in Louisiana can average around $53,000 a year.
  • Chemists: process, mix and examine natural compounds to determine how they interact with other chemicals. To become a chemist one would need a four-year degree from an accredited university. Many industrial companies need both chemists and chemical engineers.

Final Thoughts

Aviation is a diverse and rewarding field that anyone who is interested in flying or who enjoys  technical hands-on care should look into. Check BRCC‘s offerings in this field.

Louisiana’s industrial field is constantly growing. It is a great alternative for graduating high school seniors who don’t want a traditional four-year degree. More information can be found on GBRIA’s website.

Written by Alvin Coleman